Terminology Principles

Jan 13, 2012

Transparency:
Can the reader understand what the concept is about by looking at the term?
Consistency:
Is the new term or appellation consistent with the naming in the subject field? Or does it introduce new aspects at least very deliberately or only when necessary?
Appropriateness:
Are the connotations evoked by the designation intentional? And do they follow “established patterns of meaning within the language community?”
Linguistic economy:
Is the term or appellation as short as possible, so as to avoid arbitrary abbreviations by users?
Derivability and compoundability:
Is it easy to form other terms, e.g. compounds, with the new term?
Linguistic correctness:
Does the new designation conform to morphological, morphosyntactic, and phonological norms of the language?
Preference for native language:
Is the new term or appellation borrowed from another language? Or could it be replaced by a native-language designation?

Source:
ISO 704:2009: Terminology work - Principles and methods via Barbara Inge Karsch.

In Greek these principles are respectively Διαφάνεια, Συνέπεια, Καταλληλότητα, Οικονομία, Παραγωγικότητα (και συνθετικότητα), Ορθότητα and Εντοπιότητα, according to ΕΛΟΤ 402